People

Jessica E. Young, Ph.D.

Principal Investigator; Assistant Professor, University of Washington Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology/Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM)

Post-doctoral. UC San Diego
Ph.D. University of Washington
M.A. Sonoma State University
B.S. University of Wyoming

Contact: jeyoung@uw.edu
 

Profile and Publications

 

Young Lab Team Members

 

Harald Frankowski, Ph.D.

Research Scientist

My interests are related to aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. My studies have focused on understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis, lifespan extension and polyglutamine-triggered neurodegeneration and muscle wasting. My most recent work makes use of patient-derived pluripotent cells (iPCS) to understand the mechanisms of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, I am interested in developing neuronal in vitro model recapitulating phenotypic and metabolic patterns found in elderly patients.

Contact: haryf@uw.edu

 

Chizuru Kinoshita

Research Scientist

I love to see beautiful rosettes being formed during iPSC differentiation.

Contact: ckino@uw.edu

 

Yoshito Kinoshita

Research Scientist

Neuronal apoptosis; Mitochondrial dynamics; Inter-organelle membrane contact and functional communication among mitochondria, ER and the endolysosomal system; Neuroprotective function of Endophilin-B1.

Contact: ykino@uw.edu

 

Travis Moerk

Research Scientist

Bachelor of Science UW Biology - MCB; Prior to joining the Young lab I spent 3 years as a Research Scientist in the UW Bioengineering department with a focus on skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering models. My interest areas include organoid formation, surface functionalization, hydrogel development, and iPSC differentiation.

Contact: ctmoerk@uw.edu

 

Shannon Rose

Research Scientist

Research interests include the neuropathology and cytopathology of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

Contact: roses3@uw.edu

 

 

Adrian Wang

Research Scientist

My research interests are in the application of in vitro cellular differentiation to study tissue damage in adult humans. Human tissue during adulthood, save for a few specific tissue types, exhibits extremely limited regenerative capabilities after injury or disease, so I am interested in utilizing early developmental processes to study the regenerative properties in adults.

Contact:

 

 

Swati Mishra, Ph.D.

Senior Fellow

My current research interests include understanding dysfunctions in intracellular trafficking pathways implicated in Alzheimer's disease.

 

Charles(Andy) Williams,Ph.D.

Senior Fellow

I am interested in exploring the relationship between the cytopathology of Alzheimer's disease and the cellular and network physiology of neurons using human induced pluripotent stem cells.


Contact:

 

 

Allison Knupp

PhD Candidate

My goal is to understand the molecular mechanisms and neuropathology underlying Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) in adults. Although AD is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting the elderly population, current animal models are insufficient to accurately recreate phenotypes of the disease. My interests are in developing a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model that allows the study of both genetic and aging risk factors for AD. My current research utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 genome-edited cell lines to generate neural cells containing AD-risk variants. By establishing an in vitro model for AD, I hope to reveal biological mechanisms of the disease and further elucidate the interaction of aging and genetic risk factors in neurodegeneration.

Contact: knuppa@uw.edu

 

Kira Evitts

PhD Student

I am a PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering, and I am co-advised by Drs. Jessica Young and Ying Zheng. I am working on generating a vascularized cortical organoid model of the brain for the study of vascular and inflammatory contributions to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). I am interested in using my engineering background to develop tools that will improve in vitro models of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases and can be used to screen therapeutic compounds in a human specific system for more successful clinical translation.

Contact: kevitts@uw.edu

 

Fred Yeboah

PhD Candidate

Fred graduated from Alabama State University in 2016 with a bachelor’s in Biology and a minor in Chemistry. He moved to Boston for a postbac program with Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research (NIBR) and Harvard University. In 2018 he joined the UW Molecular & Cellular Biology Ph.D. program and is currently focused on understanding the role of HDAC2 in aging and in Alzheimer’s Disease.

Contact: yeboafr1@uw.edu

 

Lina Park

Undergraduate Student

I am a third-year undergraduate student at the University of Washington studying Neuroscience and American Sign Language. My research interests involve understanding the mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease using human induced pluripotent stem cells and how neuronal endosomal trafficking is affected in neurodegenerative diseases.

Contact:

 

Tiara Schwarze-Taufiq

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate at the University of Washington interested in the molecular and cell biology underlying neurodegenerative disease and aging. In particular, I am invested in the use of iPSC-derived models to understand the mechanisms behind tau and mitochondrial dysfunction in sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

Contact: tiarast@uw.edu

 

Jashley Terrado

Undergraduate Student

I am a third-year undergraduate student at Seattle Pacific University studying Human Biology and Philosophy. I'm particularly interested in understanding mechanisms that lead to cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration through analysis of stem cell derived neural cells.

Contact:

 

Marcell Szabo

Lab technician

I have recently graduated from the University of Washington with a degree in Neuroscience and Classics. My research studies include the neuroscience of Alzheimer's disease with a focus on molecular trafficking within stem cell models, as well as the biochemical pathways of down syndrome in a mouse model. I plan to continue studying the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease within stem cell derived microglia while applying for MD/PhD programs for the future.

Contact: szabom@uw.edu

 

Previous Lab Members

 

Refugio Martinez

Research Scientist

My interests are in differentiation and maturation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into functional neurons. Previous acomplishments involved genome engineering to create and characterize several fluorescent reporter lines to study cortical development in-vitro.

Contact: rmart@uw.edu

Publications:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/collections/bibliography/51084780/